New Gluten Free Baking Mixes

May 11, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

King Arthur flours is now producing gluten free flour mixes in a dedicated top 8-allergen-free facility. The mixes are also kosher. They have a multi-purpose flour, bread mix, pizza crust mix, cookie mix, brownie mix, chocolate cake mix, and muffin and pancake mixes. www.kingarthurflour.com/glutenfree

Print View Print View

Order Labels Now and Save 15% !

May 7, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Label It or Lose It has their iron-on and stick-on labels on sale for 15% off! This is an even better deal than the 10% discount we get using the VEFA code. The iron-on stickers are perfect for clothes and are washer and dryer resistant. Awesome for day care and camp! The stick-on labels are waterproof, and microwave and dishwasher safe. They can be individualized with your child’s allergies. You can also get smaller labels with just a name on them – great for sticking on the bottom of your containers the next time you take allergy-free foods to the family picnic! www.labelitorloseit.com

Print View Print View

Part Three – Dietary Guidelines and SoFas

April 26, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

SoFas is the new term for “Solid Fats and Added Sugars.” Solid fats are saturated fats and trans fats which contribute to heart disease. They are high in calories, but have few nutrients and no fiber. Sources for solid fats are mainly grain-based desserts, pizza, cheese, sausage, bacon, franks, and ribs, and fried potatoes. Milk and fruit have natural sugar, but a food has added sugars if you see the terms “high fructose corn syrup,” corn syrup solids, fructose sweetener, anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and honey. Like the foods containing solid fats, foods with added sugars provide lots of calories and few essential nutrients and no fiber. In the American diet, the major sources of added sugar are soda, energy and sports drinks, grain-based desserts, sugar-sweetened fruit drinks, dairy-based desserts, and candy.
Choose more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains to reduce the SoFas in your diet.

Print View Print View

Part Two – Dietary Guidelines and Salt

April 26, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The average sodium intake for most Americans is 3400 milligrams (mg)per day. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee wanted to set the new daily sodium goal at 1500 mg per day, however, they settled on 2300 mg as a more practical target. They also recommend further reductions in sodium to 1500 mg for people that are 51 or older, and those of any age who are African-American or have high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease.
About three quarters of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed foods, not the salt shaker. Read nutrition labels on packages. A sodium level of 150 mg per serving is considered a high sodium food.

Print View Print View

Part One: The Latest Dietary Guidelines

April 25, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were issued by the US government in January 2011. Because 2/3 of American adults and 1/3 of American children weigh more than a healthy weight, the main focus of the new guidelines is “Enjoy your food, but eat less.”
In addition, the guidelines stress a shift in what Americans eat, calling for us to include MORE vegetables, fruits, whole-grains legumes, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and seafood, as well as LESS sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars and refined grains.
While the seventh edition of the Guidelines was 112 pages long, don’t plan on having to read all of them! I will be posting and giving more details about some of the highlights here. Look for those soon!

Print View Print View

Next Page »